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20121223
20121223
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
is in washington with that part of the story. >> columbine. >> virginia tech. >> tucson. >> reporter: more than 50 stars joined forces to make this new public service announcement calling for an end to gun violence. >> it's time. >> it's time for our leaders to act. >> demand a plan. >> reporter: the question now, should a plan include the n.r.a.'s call for putting an armed officer in every school? >> it's total nonsense. >> reporter: no, is the answer from andrei nikitchyuk, whose eight-year-old son was in the hallway at sandy hook elementary school as bullets flew nearby. the solution, he says, is gun control. >> why are we allowing sales of weapons? that is terrible in this country. >> reporter: that is shared by some parents in washington, d.c., where the son of bola aina attends school. >> no, we don't want guns in our school. >> reporter: but some parents here disagree. armed guards, they say, could be part of the answer. >> i think any effort to-- to protect our children is worth it. >> one of the difficulties is being every place, everywhere, all the time. >> reporter: school safety expert
for watching "state of the union." have a safe holiday season. i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for extras. for all of us at state of the union, again, we want to wish you a merry christmas and happy holiday season. fareed zakaria "gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps" the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on the show today, we'll move past the fiscal cliff and talk about the real challenges to the economy. i will talk to the chief economic adviser of the romney campaign and president obama's former budget czar peter orzack, among others. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it's not brazil. much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i talked to pulitzer prize winning historian anne happalbaum. >>> the administration had a choic
service in washington on friday. >>> in new orleans, a federal judge has given final approval to bp settlement with gulf coast businesses and residents. bp will pay at least $7.8 billion in compensation to settle claims from the deep water horizon disaster in 2010. there is no cap on the settlement except for those claims from those in the sea food industry, so, the final bill could still be much higher. thousands of people made claims from texas to florida. >>> moving overseas to a deadly cold snap in the ukraine. hundreds more have been treated for hypothermia and frost bite. the government has set up thousands of heating centers to help people deal with the extreme cold. the temperatures there have dropped down to just one degree fahrenheit, far below the average for this time of the year. >>> well, this morning it looks like a major u.s. ally will have a new constitution, but theare still a whole lot of questions about egypt's democratic future. the draft charter has been approved by a majority of voters in a referendum. official results are expected later on. two rounds of voti
to washington next week because of the so-called fiscal cliff. legislators left washington without a deal that would avoid cutting government services on january 1st. >> a portion of interstate 80 heading to the sierra was shut down today after a series of storm related spinouts. the highway patrol shut the highway down this morning from colfax to the nevada state line. this is what it looked like this afternoon where you see a detour prompting cars to exit the freeway and turn around. at times the interstate looked more like a parking lot. >> try to get to tahoe for christmas and we saw a small sign that says road closed and thought day were kidding. but they weren't. >> the interstate eventually reopened this afternoon, the most powerful winter storm of the season is on track to drop as much as 5 feet of snow on top of the sierra. here's what it looked like earlier at squaw valley. as much as 12 inches of snow is forecast for the foot hills around reno, carson city. >> the highway patrol is looking for the driver who crashed an suv in oakland this morning. the vehicle careened off inter
of or at least making smoking pot legal in colorado as well as the state of washington. so, is that a sign that perhaps our future use of pot is actually becoming more accepted? >> well, the ones that are taking the brunt of this blow and are being devastated are our teens. this is a very serious epidemic that the obama administration cannot ignore. when you have numbers coming out that tell us we have over 100,000 teens that are going into treatment per year for marijuana treatment and we have an 80% increase, that's new users from 2008, to 2012, that's new users from 12 to 17, that's a serious epidemic, so, yes, we're in serious, serious trouble when it comes to our teens and mental capacity. >> kelly: if we make this an acceptable practice in all of our states, we're causing harm, as you say to our children and it may hamper their educational development and development as adults? >> well, we have great studies that tell us once they start smoking marijuana their iq drops significantly. their sports activities decline, their mathematical skills decline. and in fact, here is something t
eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the conference, when ik
eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentize -- president eisenhower found out who was in charge on the fifth day of the conference. the big pier o
& prose bookstore in washington, d.c., and it's about an hour. [applause] >> hey, thanks a lot. and and sorry for keeping everyone waiting. you-had a chance to finish reading my book in that time. [laughter] so i probably don't need to say anything about it. so i'll just say a few things, um, about what's in my book, and then maybe we can talk about it. as i've been sort of doing some interviews with my book, a favored way of interviewers to sort of begin the conversation is to say the rich have always been with us, after all. and, actually, that's not true. and one of the points, really the starting point of my book is to say, actually, things are different now. and we really need to be aware of this new political and economic reality that income inequality has grown hugely in the united states and in the western industrialized world and, indeed, around the world and that a lot of the action is at the very top -- is that better? okay. i'm so short, i have to move the mic. a lot of the action is at the very, very top of the income distribution. so to just give you a quick sense
. the intermission that we have coming into washington from a far is limited and imperfect. there are and nuns out there that we simply cannot know. -- unknowns out there. one as an analyst has to bear that in mind thinking where this can go. we simply do not know. >> with that pessimistic but very realistic and honest one, i want to thank you joseph and the mona for a very stimulating discussion. thank you to the audience for your questions. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> today on newsmakers, we're joined by elliot engel. he will talk about how the house and senate are winning issues around the september attack on the u.s. consulatein benghazi and the state department report in hearings held last week on the attack. >> if you work for him, you would get a material, sometimes generous overbearing, sometimes almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class, they're not going to apologize to a young secretary or typist. he had a way of sort of turning the tables in his version
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)